3 Must Watch Food Shows on Netflix to Feed Your Soul

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Must Watch Food Shows on Netflix to Feed Your Soul

Right now, in the time of the Coronavirus-19 (Covid-19), we’re bombarded with how to increase productivity, what to watch, what to cook, what new hobbies we should be learning, how we can do more, be more. It’s exhausting and not entirely helpful. If you’ve experienced a strange mid-week slump, know that you aren’t alone. To help, here are three must watch food shows on Netflix that will feed your soul on the days where you just want to lay on the couch, eat instant Ramen Noodles, and escape from reality for an hour or twelve.

To really become interested and curious about food is to become curious about where it comes from, to begin to care about sustainability and the health of the animals being eaten, and to reconnect with animals and nature in its truest form. 

Somebody Feed Phil

must-watch food shows
Somebody Feed Phil – first of the must watch food shows

The first must watch food show that is also accessible for new foodies, is Somebody Feed Phil, hosted by Phil Rosenthal (creator and writer of Everybody Loves Raymond). It currently has two seasons, with 6 episodes each, and is the most uplifting and lighthearted food series I have come across – and I’ve seen just about all the cooking shows on Netflix at least once. Phil travels around the world with his brother as the producer. Each episode features a new place and is interspersed with delicious, drool-worthy scenes of the food eaten, eruptions of joy at every meal, and conversations with hosts, parents, or brother. 

In the first episode, he travels to Bangkok, Thailand, where he visits a floating market and then a market on land. He has tea at the famed Author’s Lounge, where turn-of-the-century famous writers would stay at the hotel and write. He mixes his food travels with fun touristy-type attractions, like visiting a monastery and even an elephant sanctuary.

If you’re looking for an easy show to watch that isn’t too heavy, I wholeheartedly recommend Somebody Feed Phil. Not only do you get to watch him eat on camera as he explains the taste and his opinions, his enthusiasm for food is infectious even through a screen. 

Cooked

cooked must watch food show
Cooked – second of the must watch food shows

Cooked, a miniseries from Alex Gibney and food writer Michael Pollan, based on Pollan’s book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, is a four-episode mini series broken up by transformations in cooking through fire, water, air, and earth. The first episode starts in Australia, where the aboriginal Martu people are hunting, burning, and cooking their meals over an open fire. What makes this series different from other food shows is Pollan’s commitment to the intersection of science, history, anatomy, and good old-fashioned food as the primary source of connection between peoples and cultures.

Michael Pollan has a message, and this message carries through to his miniseries. The filmography is breathtaking and the tone of the show is smart but not dry or boring. 

Whether you are like Ed Mitchell–a famous pitmaster in eastern South Carolina–a prolific goanna hunter in Australia,  or an amateur backyard griller in suburbia, fire, cooking, and sharing meals binds us together. This show can be uncomfortable to watch when bones are snapped and whole animals are gutted and roasted off, but this is exactly why this show deserves to be watched.

To really become interested and curious about food is to become curious about where it comes from, to begin to care about sustainability and the health of the animals being eaten, and to reconnect with animals and nature in its truest form. 

Taco Chronicles

must watch food shows
Las Cronicas Del Taco (The Taco Chronicles) – third of the must watch food shows

When you think of Mexico, you probably think tacos. But not every taco is the same. This gorgeously captured Spanish series, available with English subtitles, is a fun, light way to indulge in Mexican street food without leaving your home. The Taco Chronicles, a docu-series of different tacos in Mexico, gives a voice to each type of taco meat as it proves why it is the best. It begins with tacos al Pastor, a pork taco made from different parts of the pig, tracing the history to Lebanon and Greece, where the meat is first marinated and then cooked on a vertical spit with either charcoal or gas. 

In the first episode, we travel to Mexico City and Monterrey visiting various taco stands and restaurants talking about the importance of the taco in Mexican culture, its ability to either unite or divide a people bent on arguing about the best taco stand, and its ability to soak up the alcohol after a long night of drinking. You will see a black al Pastor, in a recipe from the Yucatan, at a restaurant that focuses on tacos for sharing, and even a taco stand that is an auto mechanic workshop during the day (El Vilsito). At El Borrego Viudo, tacos can be run out to you as you wait in your car. 

This series is perfect to watch if you’re craving Mexican food or wanting to visit Mexico virtually. After having just been to Mexico City earlier this year and eaten al Pastor, I can highly recommend El Califa in the Condesa neighbourhood. If you want to learn more about where you should visit in Mexico City, visit this piece

Any must watch food shows you think should definitely be on this list? Comment below or message me on IG! What are you watching in the time of COVID-19?

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